UN investigator finds ‘sense of loss, alienation and indignity’ in US Native population

From Alaska Dispatch

Numerous sources report that James Anaya, United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, has concluded his official visit investigating the status of Native Americans in the United States.

Anaya’s formal report will be presented to the UN Human Rights Council in September, but for now, he’s discussing what he learned over two weeks in travels to urban and rural Native American communities, including a visit to Alaska.

Anaya’s initial conclusions will likely surprise no one who is aware of the multi-generational effort in the United States to eradicate indigenous cultures and marginalize their communities.

“In all my consultations with indigenous peoples in the places I visited it was impressed upon me that the sense of loss, alienation and indignity is pervasive throughout Indian Country,” Anaya wrote in his end-of mission statement.

“It is evident that there have still not been adequate measures of reconciliation to overcome the persistent legacies of the history of oppression and that there is still much healing that needs to be done,” he said.

Anaya reports that he learned of widespread discrimination on racial grounds, both against individuals and in the interaction between state and federal government entities and tribes. Such discrimination even affects economic development and local issues.

“For example, with the treatment of children in schools both by their peers and by teachers as well as the educational system itself; the way native Americans and indigenous peoples are reflected in the school curriculum and teaching,” he said.

From Alaska Dispatch

Numerous sources report that James Anaya, United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, has concluded his official visit investigating the status of Native Americans in the United States.

Anaya’s formal report will be presented to the UN Human Rights Council in September, but for now, he’s discussing what he learned over two weeks in travels to urban and rural Native American communities, including a visit to Alaska.

Anaya’s initial conclusions will likely surprise no one who is aware of the multi-generational effort in the United States to eradicate indigenous cultures and marginalize their communities.

“In all my consultations with indigenous peoples in the places I visited it was impressed upon me that the sense of loss, alienation and indignity is pervasive throughout Indian Country,” Anaya wrote in his end-of mission statement.

“It is evident that there have still not been adequate measures of reconciliation to overcome the persistent legacies of the history of oppression and that there is still much healing that needs to be done,” he said.

Anaya reports that he learned of widespread discrimination on racial grounds, both against individuals and in the interaction between state and federal government entities and tribes. Such discrimination even affects economic development and local issues.

“For example, with the treatment of children in schools both by their peers and by teachers as well as the educational system itself; the way native Americans and indigenous peoples are reflected in the school curriculum and teaching,” he said.

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About Vince

I am a Tlingit, born and raised in Tlingit Country, and a proud member of the Tlingit Nation.
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One Response to UN investigator finds ‘sense of loss, alienation and indignity’ in US Native population

  1. Jean says:

    I am responding only to the headline, as it caught my eye:
    ‘sense of loss, alienation and indignity’ is a way to describe entire generations since the early 70s. White, Black, Latino, and as you evidence, Native American as well. Born here or immigrants, even.
    And the sexual violence you mentioned in a previous article is far more widespread than most mainstream media will allow (admit).
    Roissy is a good starting point, if you haven’t read his blog already; a few twists here and there, Fifth Horseman will show up, if you haven’t found them already. (heartiste.wordpress.com; I forget the fifth hroseman’s site, maybe futurist.blogspot.com? ) In Mala fide has shut down, ut you might be able to find some archives; hawaiianlibertarian.blogspot.com might also be interesting reading.

    Liberalism (Capital L) is the disease. Unfortunately, Conservatism (Again, capital letter) is NOT the cure: it is the other side of the coin of the same disease.

    We have to get serious about dealing with these people. Cartels, corrupt police, nanny-staters, et al.

    There are several generations of men who are looking for that very solution, in fact – they just don’t know it yet. For more, look at Jack Donovan (I think it’s just his name + “.com”, and there are links from Attack teh system to some of his work, I believe.) Many want meaning in their life; modern feedlot life of the average American Sheeple breeds disease of physical and mental and spiritual form.
    Many philosophers know this; Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Black Elk, not to mention traditional names like Plato and Socrates and Descartes.

    Our “Leaders” do not know of these men, nor do they wish to learn from history.
    We must “educate” them, for the good of the tribe – whether that tribe is a Native American tribe, or even so broad as Celt or Spanish or German… The dead wood must be thinned somehow.

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