A couple years ago I cut my pop consumption down to a 6 pack per month. Then I cut it out completely. Now there are no refined sugars in my household.

The author hits the nail on the head: pop is cheap. We can thank federal subsidies for the corn industry for that. Less noticeable are the subsidies that support the massive transportation infrastructure across the country. These subsidies go to support mass produced, preserved, packaged foods which quickly replace locally produced, organic, healthy foods. A lot of colonization comes to us via that highway system.

Next up for me is replacing all of the chicken, beef and pork that I eat with salmon, elk and deer meat!

urbanative

i wanted to write about pop because i thought it would be interesting (i also needed a reason to use this picture). on its own, pop can be a tame topic. thing is, as soon as you start talking about pop and native people, it morphs into something else. i mentioned this realization to a friend – he said: “yah (in a tone similar to “duh!”), it’s a stereotype that native people love pop.”

i did a quick poll of a few native friends and co-workers. do you like pop? how many pops do you drink a day?

answers:

“yep, love pop. i drink one or two a day.

“i never drink plain water, only pop or juice.”

“i have one everyday with lunch.”

“i drink as much as i can get in me.”

“i love pop, i really do.”

that last comment was by adam gaudry: friend, co-worker, phd…

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About Vince

I am a Tlingit, born and raised in Tlingit Country, and a proud member of the Tlingit Nation.
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One Response to

  1. Vince says:

    Reblogged this on American Indian/Alaska Native – Attack The System and commented:

    A couple years ago I cut my pop consumption down to a 6 pack per month. Then I cut it out completely. Now there are no refined sugars in my household. The author hits the nail on the head: pop is cheap. We can thank federal subsidies for the corn industry for that. Less noticeable are the subsidies that support the massive transportation infrastructure across the country. These subsidies go to support mass produced, preserved, packaged foods which quickly replace locally produced, organic, healthy foods. A lot of colonization comes to us via that highway system. Next up for me is replacing all of the chicken, beef and pork that I eat with salmon, elk and deer meat!

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