Visiting at.óowu at the Portland Art Museum

In March I visited the Portland Art Museum along with some clan relatives and Aandeyein to view and handle Naanyaa.aayí at.óowu, Teikhweidi at.óowu and Raven (probaly Kiks.ádi) at.óowu dating back to the 1800’s. NAGPRA claims are in process or planned for many of these objects to return them to their ancerstral homes in Lingít Aaní. These items are our title to the land and proof of our legitimacy as sovereign Tlingit clans.

The process of assimilation was strong and deliberate during the 1800’s and 1900’s. Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian people were forced to give up clan allegiances and our tribal way of life in order to receive the protection of the United States government. Our at.óowu was seperated from the people and placed in museums, symbolically burying our culture alive. Returning these objects to their respective clans is a reversal of this process and a revolutionary act.

Raven Staff. Probably Kiks.ádi, the clan from which my clan, the Teeyhíttaan, originates. — at Portland Art Museum.

Raven Staff. Probably Kiks.ádi, the clan from which my clan, the Teeyhíttaan, originates. — at Portland Art Museum.

Naanyaa.aayí club. — at Portland Art Museum.

Naanyaa.aayí club. — at Portland Art Museum.

Mother in Law Mask. Naanyaa.aayí. Notice the lip plate piercing. — at Portland Art Museum.

Mother in Law Mask. Naanyaa.aayí. Notice the lip plate piercing. — at Portland Art Museum.

Naanyaa.aayi Chilkat Robe. Mimics the house screen in Chief Shakes Tribal House. See here: http://1.usa.gov/1LQT1Uo — at Portland Art Museum.

Naanyaa.aayi Chilkat Robe. Mimics the house screen in Chief Shakes Tribal House. See here: http://1.usa.gov/1LQT1Uo — at Portland Art Museum.

Teikhweidi from Yakutat. Chilkat Tunic. — at Portland Art Museum.

Teikhweidi from Yakutat. Chilkat Tunic. — at Portland Art Museum.

Mud Shark Hat. Naanyaa.aayí at.óowu. — at Portland Art Museum.

Mud Shark Hat. Naanyaa.aayí at.óowu. — at Portland Art Museum.

Posted in at.óowu, Building a Tlingit Nation, Clan Based Property, Decolonization, Sovereignty | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Canaries in the Gold mine: Protecting the Ancestors yet to come in the British Columbia/Southeast Alaska Transboundary Region from Large-Scale Mining Development

Originally posted on "The one who watches over the land":

Tlingit and Haida ancestral territories and ways of life
The Tlingit and Haida nations’ ancestral territories cover all of Southeast Alaska and portions of the Yukon Territory and British Columbia. The border between the United States and Canada was not of indigenous creation and we Southeast Alaskans still have family ties in the Yukon and British Columbia. Two other things do not acknowledge this political border: salmon and pollution. Our peoples’ food security and cultural existence depend on clean water and salmon that are still bountiful in this region. Traditional hunting and fishing will continue to the backbone of our cultures and economies, provided that essential habitat is respected. Yet large-scale mining in British Columbia could threaten water quality and essential salmon spawning habitat that our communities depend on.

What’s going on in British Columbia?
British Columbia (BC) is experiencing a mining boom at breakneck speed without second thoughts on…

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Comic: What is Colonialism?

Originally posted on Warrior Publications:

A four part comic by Zig Zag, originally published in Broken Pencil magazine.

Colonialism Comic 1

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Free Lingít Aaní!

Today is Free Nations Day.

Free Nations Day is an opportunity to reclaim the idea that nations are voluntary groupings of free individuals, not externally imposed political borders or states. Both geographic localities and identities that transcend space are legitimate entities with the right to decide their own ways of life.

Courtesy of Tlingit Readers Inc.; produced by the late Andrew Hope III

Courtesy of Tlingit Readers Inc.; produced by the late Andrew Hope III

Lingít Aaní, or the Tlingit Nation if you will, is a tribal nation captive by and split between two externally imposed states and their borders: the US and Canada. Hundreds, if not thousands of cultural groups, linguistic groups, tribes, and other nations join us in this common experience: captivity and division in our own lands. We are the captive nations of the world.

Lately Kurdistan, Catalonia and Scotland have been making the news in their struggle for freedom. Let the world also know that the Tlingit people are a nation, too, divided and surrounded by political borders that were not our making. Let the world know of the hundreds of tribes and tribal Nations in North America that suffer a similar fate. Happy Free Nations Day, and decolonize Lingít Aaní!

Posted in activisim, Building a Tlingit Nation, Decolonization, Indigenous Anarchism, Sovereignty | 1 Comment

Ts’ka7 Warriors Burn Down Imperial Metals Ruddock Creek Mine Bridge

Originally posted on Warrior Publications:

Fire handWarrior Publications received the following communique:
Secwepemc Ts’ka7 Warriors deactivate Imperial Metals Ruddock Creek mine road.
International Statement, October 14, 2014

With much discussion with Elders Councils and around Sacred fires and ceremonies the Secwepemc Ts’ka7 Warriors have acted out their collective responsibility and jurisdiction to and in the Ts’ka7 area by deactivating the Imperial Metals Ruddock Creek mine road.

Imperial Metals Corporation never asked for or received free, prior and informed consent to operate in Secwepemc Territory.  The Imperial Metals Mount Polley mine disaster, in the area known as Yuct Ne Senxiymetkwe, the absolute destruction and devastation of our Territory has never been answered for.  No reparations have been made.    Instead Imperial Metals continues to force through another mine in our Territory while criminalizing the Klabona Keepers of the Tahltan Nation also exerting their jurisdictional and withholding consent from the same company.

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Progress

No more diabetes

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Revolution and American Indians: “Marxism is as Alien to My Culture as Capitalism”

Originally posted on Attack the System:

The End of Capitalism

This is one of the most striking and intelligent articles I’ve ever read, encouraging a total reconfiguring of how to view capitalism and revolution.  Russell Means was a leader in the American Indian Movement (AIM) of the 1960s and 70s, and remains one of the most outspoken Native Americans in the U.S.

I came across this essay while researching for my upcoming critique of Marxism, and was blown away by its clarity. This is Means’ most famous essay. It was published in Ward Churchill’s book “Marxism and Native Americans”, under the title “The Same Old Song”, and has appeared elsewhere under the names “Marxism is a European Tradition,” and “For America to Live, Europe Must Die.” Yet, it is actually not very available on the internet.  I hope by republishing it I will raise some much-needed debate on the nature of the revolutionary project today.

I…

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